Current research

Studies currently recruiting

  • Walking and Age Study- The purpose of this study is to find ways to help older individuals with memory loss stay active and avoid injuries.  We are looking at which walking and movement tests can help us predict changes of mobility in older adults and which older adults might be at risk for falls or other accidents.
  • Neuroimaging and Function Study- The purpose of this study is to study the relationships between brain regions, physical performance and cognitive function in older adults with memory problems.

Roybal research funding opportunities

The Northwest Roybal Center for Translational Research on Aging is pleased to announce the availability of noncompeting administrative supplements from the National Institute of Health/National Institute on Aging to increase the diversity of the health related research workforce.

Pilot proposals will be submitted through the Northwest Roybal Center parent grant, must contribute to the Northwest Roybal Center Mission, and must advance the research career development of the candidate.

Who is Eligible?

  1. Early Career Investigators who represent racial and ethnic groups that have been shown to be under-represented in biomedical research.
  2. The investigator must be employed at the junior faculty level (instructor or assistant professor) with at least one year of postdoctoral or equivalent research experience.

Applications will be reviewed by the Roybal Center Scientific Advisory Board using the following selection criteria:

  • Appropriateness of applicant for the program.
  • Goals and aims for the pilot project
  • Scientific merit of the proposed research
  • Feasibility to complete the project within the time frame

For more information please contact:  Rebecca Logsdon, PhD, Roybal Pilot Core Co-director (logsdon@uw.edu), or Linda Teri, PhD, Roybal Center Director (lteri@uw.edu)

 

Current Research

Functional Markers of Mobility Disability in Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment
Year 2 pilot project (Ellen McGough, Principal Investigator)
The overall objective of this study is to identify functional markers of mobility disability in older adults with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. For this study, laboratory-based and portable quantitative motion analysis systems are being utilized to develop sensitive assessment tools of functional mobility that can be used in the homes of older adults with cognitive impairment.

  • Volunteer for this study.

A Pilot Study to Reduce Fall Risk in Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment Year 1 pilot project (Hilaire Thompson, Principal Investigator)
Approximately one in three older adults fall annually and falls are the primary cause of traumatic injury in older adults. Prevention of falls is a significant public health priority, as one of the Healthy People 2020 goals is to reduce the rate of emergency department visits by older adults due to falls by 10%.

Cognitive training (CT) involves exercises that target specific cognitive tasks like executive function. It has been speculated that routinely performing such tasks may increase overall functional ability. Thus the purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a CT intervention to reduce risk of fall and fall-related outcomes in a group of older adults with cognitive impairment at risk for fall.